Evaporation Diffusion

- Aug 25, 2017 -

Evaporation is the amount of water that is dispersed to the air during a certain period of time, usually with the number of millimeters in the thickness of the evaporated water layer, and the water evaporation of the surface or soil is measured by different evaporators respectively. The higher the general temperature, the smaller the humidity, the greater the wind speed, the lower the pressure, the greater the evaporation, the smaller the evaporation. In microscopic terms, evaporation is the process by which liquid molecules depart from the liquid surface. Because the molecules in liquids are constantly making irregular motions, their average kinetic energy is sized to fit the temperature of the liquid itself. Because of the irregular motions and collisions of molecules, at any given moment some molecules have kinetic energy greater than the average kinetic energy. These molecules with sufficient kinetic energy, such as in the vicinity of the liquid, whose kinetic energy is greater than the amount of work needed to overcome the gravitational force between the molecules in the liquid, can escape from the liquid surface and become the vapor of the liquid, which is the evaporation phenomenon. After colliding with other molecules, the flying molecule may return to the liquid surface or into the liquid interior. If the molecule flies out more than it flies back, the liquid evaporates.